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TIANA RONSTADT

Life Events


Every stage of life has its own financial needs and concerns. The life events on this page can help you target the key financial strategies and issues that are likely to be most important to you in this stage of your life.

Starting Out    Changing Jobs    Coping with Unemployment    Getting Married    Starting a Family    Buying a Home    Saving for College    Starting a Business    Planning/Saving for Retirement    Managing College Expenses    Long-Term Care Planning    Planning an Estate    Planning for Business Succession    Nearing Retirement/Retirement    Caring for an Aging Parent    Loss of Spouse    Financial Windfall    Getting Divorced   
 
Receiving Unemployment Benefits

Do you worry about changes in the economy? Have you recently been fired or a victim of downsizing? Whatever your situation, you may be wondering if you're eligible for unemployment benefits. For a basic understanding of how unemployment benefits work, read on!

Am I eligible?

Although specific eligibility requirements vary from state to state, most states have the same basic standards for collecting unemployment benefits. They include:

  • You must be unemployed or working less than full time
  • You must meet certain income requirements
  • You must be ready, willing, and able to work
  • You must have involuntarily left your job

In general, you won't be eligible for benefits if:

  • You quit your job simply because you didn't like it
  • You're fired for committing a crime (e.g., stealing)
  • You've never worked before

For more information, contact your state's local employment office. You can also look in the state government section of your phone book under Unemployment Insurance, Unemployment Compensation, Employment Insurance, or Employment Service. Or, you can try surfing the Internet using these same key terms.

Where does the money come from?

In most states, unemployment compensation is financed by employer contributions through a payroll tax. In a few states, employees are also required to contribute a minimal amount to the fund.

How do I apply?

Most states will allow you to apply for benefits:

  • In person
  • By telephone
  • By mail

When filling out the application, you'll be asked a lot of questions, so have the following information handy:

  • Your Social Security number
  • Your last employer's name, address, and phone number
  • Your last day of work and the reason that you're no longer working
  • Your salary history
  • Your proof-of-citizenship status
How are benefits calculated?

Regardless of which state you live in, you'll receive a weekly unemployment benefit based on how long you were employed and your prior wages. The state will calculate your average weekly wage, and you will receive a percentage of that wage based on your state's formula. You can figure out your average weekly wage by adding up 12 months' worth of pay stubs and dividing that number by 52. If you were salaried, just divide your annual salary by 52.

How long can I receive benefits?

In most states, you can receive benefits for up to 26 weeks. However, federal laws and some state laws provide for additional benefits to be paid to workers who exhaust their regular benefits during periods of high unemployment. These additional benefits may generally be paid up to 14 weeks (20 weeks in some states) and are funded partly by state governments and partly by the federal government.

Are unemployment benefits taxable?

The answer to this question comes as a big surprise to many people. Yes, the unemployment compensation you receive is generally taxable. In some states, you can ask that taxes be withheld from your unemployment check. This could save you from a big tax bill at the end of the year. For more information, consult your tax advisor.



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Securities and Investment Advisory Services offered through Woodbury Financial Services, Inc., Member FINRA, SIPC, and Registered Investment Advisor. Power Women Investing and Woodbury Financial Services, Inc., are not affiliated entities.

All questions or concerns must be directed through the business email address or phone number listed in the profile or information section. Services are only available in jurisdictions where the Representative is licensed and registered to conduct business. Please contact the Representative or refer to their business website for a list of these states. Neither Woodbury Financial Services, Inc., nor its registered representatives or employees, provide tax or legal advice. As with all matters of a tax or legal nature, you should consult with your tax or legal counsel for advice.

This is not an official site of Woodbury Financial Services, Inc., or its affiliates. The opinions expressed by participants are those of the participants and are not those of Woodbury Financial Services, Inc., or its affiliates. This site may contain links to articles, comments, or other information from a third party. Woodbury Financial Services, Inc., or its affiliates do not endorse or accept responsibility of third party content. This content has not been reviewed by Woodbury Financial Services, Inc., or its affiliates for completeness or accuracy. 

 



This communication is strictly intended for individuals residing in the state(s) of AZ, CA, CO, FL, GA, HI, IL, IN, MA, MN, NY, NC, OH, PA, SC, TN, TX and WI. No offers may be made or accepted from any resident outside the specific states referenced.
 


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